What It’s Like To Have Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)

Hello, my name is David Fleming.

David Flemming FTD Dementia

The Flemming Family

Recently, I was diagnosed with Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). I had my twenty -four hour pity party and then it finally hit me. I am a retired firefighter and Emergency Technician. I have seen so many victims of accidents and there are so many people with health, financial and relationship problem who had far worse problems than me in life. I finally realized, why did I think I should not be immune to the problems of this world? What made me so special, that I should be exempt from these problems of life? I have the greatest family in the world. Four sisters, a brother, two sons, a granddaughter, in-laws, cousins, aunts and uncles, friends and a church family who love and support me always with unconditional love. I know I am the richest and luckiest man alive. I sat down and wrote to all my family and friends and thanked them for standing up with me and all their support and love.

I decided that day, that I was going to use all my God given talents to help others less fortunate than myself. I would strive to become a better man, brother, father, grandfather and friend. I would give my love to all these people, better than I have ever done before. I have always loved them, but I now love with more compassion and in a more passionate way.

I have always been a person with a positive attitude, but now I am more determined than ever to be more positive and a good example to everyone I meet. I am doing several things to keep myself as alert and useful as I possibly can be. I help my sisters, my church family and friends with construction, electrical, plumbing, and even helped one sister devise a filing system to aid her with her finances. I do some cooking, laundry, and keep a clean and neat home. I work crossword puzzles, read books and play games that exercise my mind. I walk a lot and work at doing things that keep me in good mental and physical shape. I love to dance and sing karaoke. I make my bed every day and make certain that my medicines are in my daily planner. I try to pay attention to my physical appearance. I dress and clean up pretty well. I brush my teeth, shower and shave every day. A positive attitude and prayers will keep us sharp and looking and acting young. Our hearts will take care of the rest.

For those who are taking care of us, please don’t forget to tell us what we are doing different. We may not know that we are digressing, but we need to know what aspects of our lives that we need to work on to keep us on top of our deficiencies. Also, if you are taking care of our mail and our bills, please remember that we still need to feel important and loved. So go ahead and send that junk mail to us! You have the checkbook and credit cards, so we won’t be buying all that junk that they ask us to buy. Another thing you can do is to give us cash when we go out to dine or to the movies. Just enough cash to pay for what we doing gives us pride to still be able to pay our own way, at least in our own minds.
I am still looking forward to a bright and exciting future. I will never give up on myself and what I can do to help others. I want to travel and see the world before I have to say I cannot do this anymore. We are all trying to get through this disease with as few problems as possible.

Sincerely, David

Why I Volunteer With The Alzheimer’s Association Of Colorado

Tokunbo Joseph Olowookere

Tokunbo Joseph Olowookere

The threat of Alzheimer’s is real. This is why I volunteer with and support The Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado. No immediate members of my family have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, but I have some extended family members that have/had the disease. My Pastor’s husband died with Alzheimer’s. I don’t remember the man, because he was ill with the disease when I met him as a child. From what my Pastor speaks about her husband, he was an exceptional man. He was respected by his church as a Deacon, and an excellent provider for his wife and nine children.

I have an Uncle who’s wife’s mom and dad have/had Alzheimer’s. Her mom is still alive, but her dad passed away with the disease. He served as mayor of his city, Altheimer, AR. I wasn’t familiar with former Mayor Fred Martin, but I did meet his wife. I remember during family reunions, my Aunt would have her mom re-fold t-shirts to keep her busy, while others enjoyed the family reunion festivities. I understand eventually, they had to put Mrs. Martin in a nursing home.

These three examples of people with great minds getting Alzheimer’s proves, as Alzheimer’s Association board member, and fellow member of The Association’s African American Advisory Committee, Phillip Heath states, “Alzheimer’s is an equal opportunity destroyer.” There is a form of dementia called “younger-onset Alzheimer’s,” that can occur in the 40-50 age group. This concerns me, because I’m getting older.

I appreciate that the Alzheimer’s Association has a multicultural outreach that caters to African Americans, Hispanics, and other minorities. I’ve volunteered on The Helpline, which is a great first contact for people that have questions about Alzheimer’s. Being a member of The African American Advisory Committee, has granted me great opportunities to meet and engage with important people of our time. People like Dr. Ben Carson, Neurosurgeon and Dr. Huntington Potter.

African American Alzheimer's Risk

Now the Alzheimer’s Association, through staff member, Rosalyn Reese and The African American Advisory Committee, have launched an enterprising plan called, “Purple Power Champions Initiative.” It’s about going to black churches, via their health ministries to bring awareness about Alzheimer’s. Since African Americans are more likely to get Alzheimer’s then other ethnic groups, it makes sense that African Americans, and people in general get educated about the disease [African Americans are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's due to the correlation of the disease to high blood pressure and diabetes both of which have a higher incidence among blacks and Hispanics]. The Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado also has many free classes and courses available to the public.

Not only has the Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado made me more aware about the seriousness of this deadly disease called Alzheimer’s, the Association is fun! I enjoy the annual fundraisers, Walk To End Alzheimer’s and The Blonde vs. Brunette Flag Football Game. The staff and volunteers I’ve met at the Alzheimer’s Association are good people to know. So whether you are African American, or any other ethnic group or race, The Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado is a good organization to utilize and support. I am proud to be associated with this organization.

Sincerely,

Tokunbo Joseph Olowookere

50 Marathons At Age 50 For Alzheimer’s

David KnappHi there! My name is David Knapp and in celebration of turning 50 this year I plan on running 50 marathons in memory of my mother Audrey Jean Knapp who died of Alzheimer’s in 2001. I hope to raise $50,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado and the 72,000 Coloradans living with the disease.

I know what many of you are thinking, “David, 50 marathons at age 50 is an absurd goal.

However, a favorite teacher once told me, “Always chase windmills. Even if they call you a crazy old man – keep chasing windmills. The day you stop chasing windmills is the day you die.” Taking that advice to heart, I firmly believing that the fatigue and injuries one endures during a “noble quest” (to quote Cervantes’ knight errant) are but a small price to pay for all the richness and rewards that the noble quest provides. Watching my Mom deteriorate as the disease progressed was undoubtedly the most emotionally painful experience of my life. But watching the physical, mental, and emotional toll it took on my father as he tried to care for her was a close second. So the challenge of running 50 marathons in one year will pale in comparison to what Dad went through as her caregiver.

David Knapp - Running Chicago Marathon

David Knapp – Running the Chicago Marathon

Just so you know, I’m no stranger to marathon challenges. In 2004, I ran 40 marathons during the calendar year to celebrate turning 40 years old. So running 50 to raise money for this incredible organization is a natural progression. I know it won’t be easy, but I want to complete next year’s quest to help others – the individuals who are dealing with this terrible disease, as well as their family members who are facing the difficult and heart-wrenching experience that my family went through with Mom.

Please help me reach my “50 Marathons for $50,000” goal by donating whatever you can. Keep in mind that many businesses and corporations have donation-matching policies in place – so if you could ask about that at your workplace, I’d greatly appreciate it. Also, I’m looking for corporate sponsors to help offset the tremendous costs involved in registering for and traveling to races, so please let me know if your organization would be willing to help with that aspect of the marathon quest.

Thank you in advance for your generosity. Together, we can help researchers find the critical medical breakthrough that one day will lead to a world without Alzheimer’s.

-David

You can follow David’s adventures before, during, and after the marathon quest at:

Fundraising page: act.alz.org/goto/DavidKnapp
Twitter: twitter.com/DrDavidKnapp
Facebook: facebook.com/ChasingWindmills50

National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

This month is National Caregiver Month and National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. It can also be a hard time of year for those living with Alzheimer’s.

Bill with the whole family at Christmas in 2006

Bill with the whole family at Christmas in 2006

My own family was impacted 12 years ago as my husband Bill began to develop symptoms of the disease at only 52 years of age. Thanks to my healthy active parents, two wonderful sisters and a strong community network, we were able to care for Bill at home for most of the years he lived with the disease. The holidays were the most stressful for me however. We tried to keep our traditions alive for the first few years, going to the Nutcracker Ballet, cutting our tree from nearby forest land, walking in the annual Golden Holiday Parade. However, as the disease progressed Bill got more anxious about many of those cherished traditions. He worried about buying and wrapping gifts for me and other family members. Party invitations had to be carefully considered if there would be a lot of people because he was easily confused as well as embarrassed at not remembering names. He got frustrated at not being able to make the delicious meals he had enjoyed creating each year during the holidays. I found the tasks specially associated with the holidays as well as many others household chores falling to me alone. With advice from the Alzheimer’s Association, I finally took a hard look at what we were continuing to do each year that was causing me added stress and contributing to a general sense of exhaustion. Once we stopped to think about all the things we were doing, we refocused on what we truly loved the most and looked how to make those things just a little easier for both of us. By changing things a bit we could still manage to keep the joy in the holidays. Cutting the tree on forest land was still manageable if I was the one who used the saw, homemade items could be supplemented with store-bought goodies, friends could take Bill shopping for gifts and help him manage the money, and we could spend time celebrating with smaller groups of people that we really cared about.

This time of year will always be bittersweet for me having lost Bill to Alzheimer’s four years ago this coming February but his legacy lives on every time I share our story and offer insight about caregiving.

This month, take some time and look around your own life. Find the caregivers who need your love and support this holiday season. Sometimes it’s hard to ask for help. If you can be specific and suggest some ides of your own, you may find your offer is received and with a great deal of appreciation and relief. Offer to do errands like grocery shopping or picking up medications at the pharmacy. Drop by with a ready-to-cook meal. Give the gift of your time to sit with the person who is ill or needing a companion so the caregiver can take some time off. Offer to wrap gifts or do the decorating. Caregivers are often too busy to think about themselves and what they need in order to keep going. Let them know they aren’t alone. If you know someone who needs help caring for a loved one who has Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia make sure they know about the Alzheimer’s Association. All of the services for individuals and families are free and just a phone call away. 800.272.3900 Many caregivers will tell you there was never any question about whether they would care for someone they love. Each and every day is a gift, every moment, even when things get tough, a treasured memory. Find a way to honor a caregiver in your life this holiday.

Living Life Well with A Diagnosis

Bruce Peterson

Bruce and Marikay Peterson

Yes, my wife’s diagnosis caused confusion at first. Initially we thought the short term memory loss was similar to others our age, but the tests identified a more severe limitation: Alzheimer’s

Candidly we have found many positives to this disease. It caused me to enter retirement at an earlier age than anticipated and found that I really didn’t mind missing work. The exchange from a business attitude to a more relaxed posture created a more solid marriage. Instead of me leaving an empty house to my wife(our children had moved out) at 6 am, I was sleeping longer, with less worries.

Currently we try to do something together, EACH DAY. Often times (maybe once per week) it involves an Alzheimer’s function, like our journey to Mt. Everest today. Friends have volunteered to help when I leave to play golf. It’s important to identify them before a crises, instead of after (when you can’t find them). At a recent Alzheimer’s luncheon 57 friends joined us for lunch to recognize my wife and share their concerns, to offer their prayers. You can imagine the positive impact on our entire family!

We have signed up for three/four programs that meet at the Alzheimer’s office throughout the month. We found out about Active Minds and Café Connect which encourages intellectual stimulation for seniors. Occasionally we receive free tickets to community activities. Never would we have enjoyed these many Denver activities if it were not for the diagnosis. While seeking treatment at the Anschutz Center we take pride in this wonderful expanding facility which means so much to our community. We always leave with a sense of confidence because the staff is professional while at the same time showing empathy.

Our friends have changed from a purely business and political association to new friends where we share something in common: fear about the future while coping day to day with the unknown. We enjoy our new friends as we wrestle with daily issues that are not understood by the public. We have no concerns about telling the same story multiple times or hearing a joke for the 10th time. This sincere friendship and comfort (“I understand what you’re going through”) would not have taken place a few years ago.

My wife is fully aware of her new limitations, something that might not have been admitted while working up the corporate ladder. Daily we work together to understand our feelings and how to better cope with confusion.

At this time I’m not certain of the future, but believe that this could be one of the best blessings of our retirement lives.

-Bruce Peterson

Living Life When the Diagnosis is Alzheimer’s

At the Alzheimer’s Association we often hear from families that their first reaction after a diagnosis is one of relief, because now they finally know what they are dealing with. However, what follows shortly after is a profound sense of loss at what’s to come as the disease progresses.

What many people don’t understand is that while this disease steals so much of the person known and loved by friends and family, changes can happen relatively slowly. Speech, for instance, begins to deteriorate with a person initially having trouble finding nouns and eventually, they may be unable to put sentences together.  Following step-by-step instructions or a recipe may get increasingly difficult. Balance may be impacted so falling down and dropping and spilling things may occur more often. In addition, the ability to use good judgment to make decisions may begin to decrease. That doesn’t mean life can’t be enjoyed, or trips can’t be taken or new adventures can’t be planned. Simple adjustments may just need to be made to the way you’ve always done things.

While the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are progressive, there is still a great deal of life to live after a diagnosis. What activities do you or a loved one continue to enjoy?

While the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are progressive, there is still a great deal of life to live after a diagnosis.

One man, who thoroughly enjoyed cooking in his beautifully-equipped kitchen, enlisted his wife’s help. They removed all the sharp knives, labeled drawers and moved things around so he could easily find what he needed. Then they simplified recipes and used the ones still most familiar to him so he could continue doing what he loved. Another couple who loved to dance was worried the wife’s balance problems would mean they had to stop. In fact, her dancing feet remembered all the right steps.  And yet another family switched to croquet instead of golf and now the grandchildren get out on the course with grandpa, giving them a wonderful new way to play and interact together.

Alzheimer’s is a fatal disease but it doesn’t have to bring life to a screeching halt. You can still do what you enjoy, maybe just a little differently. In fact slowing things down a bit and allowing additional time for an activity creates a more comfortable and enjoyable environment for someone with dementia . Figure out what kinds of activities are available in your area and adapt them when you can. If you enjoy visiting local museums, find out if there are hours when the crowds are smaller and whether there are docents who are trained for groups with special needs. The Denver Art Museum has a program specifically for those with dementia called Art and About that is coordinated with the Alzheimer’s Association.  Tours are offered each time a new exhibit comes to town. Walking trails designed for the sight impaired offer a unique way to follow guided walkways when balance and direction are issues for a friend or family member with dementia. If you’ve always loved to camp, try an RV instead of a tent.  A pop up camper or RV makes things easier on the care partner. More time can be spent enjoying the out of doors than on the set up, cooking and cleaning up involved with tent camping. If gardening is a special hobby, create a special bin for equipment and help mom find it each time she wants to putter with her roses. And try large-print playing cards to keep dad winning at the Bridge table. Keeping your friend or loved one busy, active, engaged and socializing may mean the disease progresses just a little bit slower. Regardless of the activity or the hobby, the real benefit is that by looking for ways to keep someone you love doing what they love, you have been given the gift of time with them to treasure.

To learn about the 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s or for ways to keep a loved one active and content go to alz.org/co or call 800.272.3900

What activities do you or a loved one continue to enjoy?

What activities do you or a loved one continue to enjoy?

The Longest Day

Last year my friends and family participated in The Longest Day on June 20, for the first time. We’ve had a Walk team for the past six first walking in honor and then in memory of my husband Bill and wanted to find a way to involve more family and friends in the cause.

The Longest Day

Join us on June 21, 2013 for The Longest Day, as together we honor those living with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.

After struggling for five years with symptoms, Bill was diagnosed with Younger Onset Alzheimer’s when he was just 57. Our journey lasted a total of nine years and he died in 2010. He was my soul mate and my best buddy on so many adventures. We camped across Colorado and into Utah, South Dakota and Wyoming. We skied resorts from Vermont to New Hampshire to Colorado to Utah and the Tetons. Even in the midst of his disease, we pushed our limits in the search for new, challenging adventures. When the Alzheimer’s Association launched The Longest Day it seemed like the perfect way to continue to honor Bill’s legacy. Along with my friends and family, we took up activities that fit best with what we love to do. My younger sister in Durango rode her horses and her road bike trainer, my parents walked the streets of Vail during what was their anniversary trip, my sister Lynne walked the trails near her home in Lakewood, and my good friend Bob and I rode our mountain bikes near Boulder for four hours. All day, somewhere in the country, our team was doing something they love to raise money and awareness in memory of Bill. Thanks to our generous friends and family, we also raised nearly $1,700 for the Association.

The Longest Day at Vail

My mom and dad walked throughout Vail for The Longest Day.

Did I mention The Longest Day is scheduled to take place on the longest day of the year? The summer solstice occurs each year in June, this year on Friday, June 21. That means there are 16 hours of daylight from sunrise to sunset. The Alzheimer’s Association chose that day in recognition of caregivers, who like me spend every day from sunrise to sunset and into the night providing care for someone they love who is living with Alzheimer’s. The tagline for the event is “for them every day is the longest day, for you it’s just one” and it rings true. The Longest Day offers us an opportunity to give up one day to raise money, awareness and an understanding that this disease steals the person you love long before they die. We have to find effective treatments, we have to stop this disease before more spouses, children, grandchildren and friends lose people who mean so very much. Please consider forming a team this year and join us in 16 hours of doing whatever you love to help end Alzheimer’s.

Sara Spaulding,
Former caregiver for best friend, partner and husband Bill Perrin, Jr
Alz.org/thelongestday

Even A Rocket Scientist Can Be at Risk for Alzheimer’s

I retired from Mission Analysis and Design (MAD scientist) 11 years ago, having worked a diverse mission set, including Apollo, Comet Sample Return, Mars exploration and classified projects (if I told you, I’d have to kill you).  One of my favorite movies is “Dr.Strangelove”.

My symptoms were first noticed by my wife about 15 years ago, which started a search for answers.  About 3 years ago, I was diagnosed with Early Stage Alzheimer’s, soon followed with a diagnosis of the behavioral variation of Frontal Temporal lobe Degeneration, or bvFTD.

I believe FTD is the more correct diagnosis, but am attending the monthly Alzheimer’s Early Stage patient support group since my diagnoses.  I encourage anyone who has dementia to attend this or any other support group.  It is a great way to share experiences in a safe environment.  You would be surprised at how many symptoms you have in common with others.

My dementia has noticeably increased over the last couple of years.  Memory is a challenge, as is math, including simple arithmetic.  Verbal communication skills and comprehension have also significantly declined.

 Difficulty completing familiar tasks can be a sign of Alzheimer's disease.

Difficulty completing familiar tasks can be a sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

The scientist in me can observe these things in a detached and studious way (a defense mechanism?) which helps, plus being a naturally low key person with a sense of humor.  Either that or my brain has reduced my ability to feel and/or consciously express things.  Probably some combination of all the above.

I have done some consulting for NASA, my last job ending in early 2012.  But it is clear that I can no longer contribute as I once did.  It was fun, and paid well, but all good things come to an end.

My motto is as it always has been, to love and appreciate my wife, to adapt to cognitive decline as best as possible, and to enjoy life as much as possible.

-Phil

Extreme Colorado Weather Puts Those with Dementia at Risk

As the temperature finally dips into seasonal ranges for winter, those caring for someone with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia should all be on notice that snow, extreme temperatures and early darkness present special problems.

Snowy Colorado LandscapeA loved one with Alzheimer’s won’t necessarily dress appropriately for colder weather. Cover as much exposed skin as possible and provide several layers of lightweight clothing for easy movement, especially if plans include time outside. A hat is important since so much body heat escapes from an uncovered head and don’t forget to add a scarf to cover up an exposed neck. Mittens keep hands warmer than gloves and may be easier to help get on and off. Clips designed for skiers can help keep track of gloves or mittens that are otherwise easily misplaced or lost.

Sundowning is a term that refers to increased anxiety, confusion and even increased sleepiness due to the decreased sunlight in the winter months. Visual perception is already an issue for many people with Alzheimer’s and can cause increased confusion or disorientation in dark or shadowy environments both inside and out. Turn lights on earlier, open curtains during daylight hours and add bulbs that simulate sunlight. Install motion detector lights to help illuminate walkways around the home as darkness may fall before arriving home from an outing. Dressing in light or bright colors or adding reflective material to clothing will help a loved one be more easily seen.

To avoid slips and falls, make sure boots are non-skid. There are many boot styles on the market that use Velcro instead of laces to allow the person with dementia some success with dressing themselves. Try separate “tracks” that attach to the soles for added traction on icy surfaces. You can also add a sharp tip to canes for that extra grip on winter days. This device is available at home health care stores.

Assume ALL surfaces are slick and by taking smaller steps and slowing down, the person with Alzheimer’s can match gait and speed to a safer level.

  • Perception problems can make it difficult for the person with Alzheimer’s to see ice on the sidewalk or realize that ice is slippery or that snow is not a solid surface.
  • Keep sidewalks and driveways clear of ice and snow to make walking outside safe for everyone, but do not overuse ice melt products which can reduce traction.
  • Use indoor or garage parking whenever possible.
  • Especially on stairs or slick spots, insist on handrail use and walk arm in arm when possible.
  • Acquire and use a State issued Handicapped placard enabling closer access to the door of buildings.

Medic Alert® + Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return® and Comfort Zone®  offer safety for wandering.Wandering is one of the most frequent and challenging problems that caregivers face. About 67 % of people with dementia will wander and become lost during the course of the disease, and most will do so repeatedly.

Wandering may be triggered when a person with Alzheimer’s disease:

  • Tries to search for familiar objects, surroundings or people when they no longer recognize their environment.
  • Tries to fulfill former obligations, such as going to work or taking care of a child.
  • Reacts to the side effects of medication that cause restlessness and confusion.
  • Tries to escape stress caused by noise, crowds or isolation.
  • Is not getting enough physical activity.
  • Is fearful of unfamiliar sights, sounds or hallucinations.
  • Searches for something specific such as food, drink, the bathroom or companionship.
Dementia Wandering

Minimize the risks of wandering by enrolling in Medic Alert® + Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return® and Comfort Zone

Never assume that being at home with someone who has Alzheimer’s makes wandering less of an issue. It only takes a moment for someone to leave the house, and the confusion and disorientation that accompany the disease means a friend or loved one can get hopelessly lost in a matter of minutes. Having some type of tracking device can provide peace of mind that a loved one could be located within a short period of time after becoming separated. Medic Alert + Safe Return and Comfort Zone are two programs that protect people diagnosed with dementia in case of a medical emergency or a wandering incident.

It is not uncommon for a wanderer to require medical attention following an incident. Through the use of a 1-800 number, MedicAlert + Safe Return provides the member’s personal health record including medical conditions, medications and allergies and can be updated 24-hours a day through a private online account or by calling the toll free number during business hours.

When someone enrolled in the program wanders, the MedicAlert + Safe Return hotline activates the resources of law enforcement, medical professionals and the local Alzheimer’s Association chapter staff to assist the member when an incident – either wandering or a medical emergency – occurs.

Comfort Zone® is a comprehensive web-based location management service. Families can remotely monitor a person with Alzheimer’s by receiving automated alerts throughout the day and night when a person has traveled beyond a preset zone. The alert can be received in any location, even notifying family members or caregivers in another state. This program is particularly useful for those in the early stages who want to maintain as much independence as possible for as long as they are able. Comfort Zone uses a location-based mapping service, or LBS . This term refers to a wide range of services that provide information about a person’s (or object’s) location very similar to a GPS device for turn-by-turn driving directions or tracking packages online. A person with Alzheimer’s wears or carries a locator device (such as a pager or cell phone) or mounts one in his or her car.

To learn more about MedicAlert + Safe Return and Comfort Zone, contact the Alzheimer’s Association Colorado Chapter at 800-272-3900 or go online to alz.org/co. For help caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or for answers to questions about memory loss, call 800-272-3900.

Year End Donations

The holiday season is always a great time to give and exercise the spirit of giving by donating to a qualified charitable organization.

Although tax savings are not usually the primary reason for charitable giving, your gift may qualify for significant tax benefits while providing much needed capital for a charity like the Alzheimer’s Association.

The rate of diagnosis is on the rise and due to the popularity of Colorado as a retirement destination, the demand for our programs and services is expected to increase dramatically in the next few years.

While we work hard to engage the business community in sponsorships for our special events, as is true with most non-profits, our budget is offset by individual giving. As you do your research and make decisions about your end of year giving, we hope you think of the Alzheimer’s Association and the thousands of Coloradoans who need our help.

There are a number of ways you could make that gift to the Association:

Direct Contributions – Gifts enable the Colorado Chapter to continue serving individuals and families in communities throughout Colorado who are living with Alzheimer’s. Designate your gift for general programs and services or to a specific program or to research.

Memorials and Honorariums – A way for family and friends to honor the memory of their loved one or those celebrating special occasions such as a birthday, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day or an anniversary.

Tree of Hope LeafTree of Hope – Each leaf on the mural, on display at the Denver office, is inscribed with the name of an individual, group or event being honored.

Employee Giving Program – Contribute by designating a specific amount to be deducted from your paycheck.

#EndAlz Shirt

Planned GiftsInclude the Alzheimer’s Association in your estate plan which can be structured to provide tax advantages and a life income while accomplishing a charitable intent.

Shop online – The Alzheimer’s Association receives a percentage of your purchase when you shop at our Web site www.alz.org/co.

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Car DonationDonate your car through Vehicles for Charity contributions to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association.

Year-end charitable donations keep giving long after your gift is received. Your generous contribution is always appreciated especially in years where financial assets are still struggling to increase in value.

-Robyn Moore, Chief Development Officer